Get Running to a Healthier You: 6 Reasons you need to become a runner

Running is not just a means to losing weight. Running has so many benefits that far surpass the reduced number on your scale—and you can start benefiting from them right now! Get yourself a proper pair of running shoes, and you’re off on your new health-boosting, blood-pressure reducing, cancer-fighting, mind-sharpening hobby. But we’ll get into that.

Putting one foot in front of the other can be hard. Especially the next day when you’re feeling the aftereffects of a great run, and all you want to do is cozy-up with your favorite pillow and binge-watch the next season of The Walking Dead. That’s you trying to walk in real life!

Push your body to the limit and it’ll certainly pay off in the long run. But for now—the burn, oh, the burn. If you don’t want to feel spent in between workouts and you need to get things done, give cryotherapy a try.

The use of very low temperatures on muscles is proven to reduce swelling, inflammation, and pain when you’re really feeling it after an intense run. Cryotherapy is the latest therapy used by professional athletes to get right back to their game after an especially intense training session or muscle injury. Cryotherapy can be applied locally to the affected muscle or generally in a cryotherapy chamber, where temperatures reach -140 degrees Celsius, or -284 degrees Fahrenheit. It will freeze muscle injury in its tracks, and may even reverse muscle damage.

So what can running do for YOU? Here are 6 reasons you should join the running community:

1. Healthy Heart

Studies show that just an hour of running per week will significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, cutting it in half compared with people who don’t run. Regular running will reduce your blood pressure and bad cholesterol levels which are indicators of cardiac health.

Running for healthy heart
2. You will actually feel happy you ran!

Before you scoff, just hear us out!

Running is the ultimate cardio workout. When you engage in cardio, your brain releases endorphins and endocannabinoids. This burst of feel-good chemicals is responsible for the “runner’s high” that you may have heard about.

In addition, running will boost the brain’s serotonin levels which reduce stress and make for a calmer state of mind.

Running ultimate cardio
3. Sexy Stems

If you’re looking for a workout that will simultaneously engage all of the biggest muscles in your body (which are in your legs), look no further than running. Your gluteus maximus, quads, and hamstrings (thighs and calves) will all benefit from a run, making your legs stronger.

4. Running is Abs-solutely Amazing!

Your core muscles engage during a run, even though you may not necessarily feel it. A strong core improves posture, stabilizes the spine, and strengthens limbs—the gorgeous six-pack doesn’t hurt either.

Running benefits
5. Improves your Brain as well as your run time

Running can actually improve brain, cognition, and cardiovascular fitness in aging. This means that runners are more protected against dementia and Alzheimer’s than non-runners. Functions like task switching, selective attention, and working memory will all be easier for older people who are physically fit.

Running health imporvements
6. May reduce the risk of cancer

According to Jennifer Van Allen in “6 Ways Running Improves Your Health,” there’s plenty of research out there that supports the theory that running can prevent cancer. The Journal of Nutrition showed that regular exercise lowers the risk of certain cancers.

Running will improve your quality of life in ways you may not expect. Looking fit and feeling fit have never been so simple as the combination of running and cryotherapy. Run until you can’t run anymore. And then use cryotherapy to do it again the next day.

References:
http://www.runnersworld.com/start-running/6-ways-running-improves-your-health/slide/4

https://greatist.com/fitness/30-convincing-reasons-start-running-now

http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/workout/running/benefits-of-running/?page=4

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnagi.2013.00075/full#B32